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Andrew’s Current Blog

Archived blogs chronicling 1492 from a bicultural perspective appear under 1492 Blogs.

Andrew’s Current Blog

Archived blogs chronicling 1492 from a bicultural perspective appear under 1492 Blogs.

 

Fort Santo Tomás

With Isabela’s construction underway on the coast, on March 12, 1494 (528 years ago), Columbus heralded his conquest of “Española,” marching with five hundred men into the mountainous region the Taínos called the Cibao to build a fort intended to garrison soldiers who...

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Weddings and Marriages

Today, I break from posting chronologically about events depicted in Columbus and Caonabó: 1493–1498 Retold to discuss the weddings and marriages of three couples—Spain’s Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand, the Taíno chieftain Caonabó and Anacaona, and Columbus and his...

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Hojeda’s Route

After crossing Puerto de los Hidalgos, Alonso de Hojeda’s expedition descended south into the great valley of the modern Dominican Republic that Columbus would name La Vega Real (the Royal Plain). Journeying for two weeks, the men forded the Yaque River (which retains...

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Search for Gold

Columbus lost no time searching for the gold he’d promised Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand. On January 7, 1494, 528 years ago, he dispatched an expedition of over thirty lightly armed soldiers to find it in the island’s mountainous interior, led by the man who would...

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First Mass at Isabela

As depicted in Columbus and Caonabó, a third of the voyagers—some four hundred men—were beset with fevers, headaches, vomiting, and diarrhea within days of debarking on the promontory. Modern epidemiologists speculate that the causes included dysentery from the...

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Selection of Permanent Site

As depicted in Columbus and Caonabó, in December 1493 fierce easterly trade winds and harsh winter storms severely impeded Columbus’s journey east to select a permanent site to initiate the island’s conquest. When he finally anchored in the inlet at Río de Gracia,...

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Search for Permanent Base for Conquest

Departing Chief Guacanagarí and the ruins of Navidad, in December 1493 Columbus’s fleet sailed back east along “Española’s” northern coast, searching for the optimal site to establish a permanent coastal base from which to launch the island’s invasion and conquest. He...

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Navidad

On November 28, 1493, 528 years ago, a search party dispatched ashore reported to Columbus that Navidad had been burned to the ground. As recounted in Columbus and Caonabó, Columbus soon would confront Chief Guacanagarí, who would deny responsibility and blame Chief...

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